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Celanese Speaks, Employee Growth

A Perspective on Female Engineers at Celanese 

Celanese’s University Recruiting Team recently attended the Society of Women Engineers Annual Conference in Austin, Texas. At this World’s Largest Conference for Women Engineers, our recruitment team sought out talented college students, recent graduates and female engineering professionals to introduce them to, and educate them on, the many benefits of working for Celanese. The opportunity to gain valuable engineering experience with a global Fortune 500 company; the culture of diversity and inclusion; and the opportunity to make a difference in the world through our many volunteer initiatives, differentiate Celanese from other companies in the chemicals and materials industry.

Celanese Speaks

Being B.O.L.D. 

In a Ted Talk video featured at the launch of the Dallas chapter of B.O.L.D. (Blacks Organized for Leadership Development), Verna Myers said,

“We can’t just decide not to see color. The problem was never that we saw color; it’s what we did when we saw color.” She went on to say, “While we’re busy pretending not to see, we are not being aware of the ways in which racial difference is changing people’s possibilities.”

I think we’d all like to believe we’re color-blind when it comes to racial diversity, but unfortunately, we’ve got a long way to go toward making equality the rule rather than the exception.

Celanese Speaks

A Lesson in Gratitude 

I had the privilege this month to serve as “nap buddy” at Vogel Alcove, an education center for homeless children of Dallas. I must admit, I was mildly disappointed to learn that being a nap buddy did not involve a nap for me . . . I love a good nap. But 10 minutes into our tour of the school, I was hopelessly devoted to helping make a difference to these precious children with no homes, if only for a few hours.

Who would have ever guessed that Dallas, Texas has the highest child poverty rate in the country among cities with more than one million people, or that 30-percent of Dallas children grow up in poverty? As a mother, this tore at my heart strings.